Initial findings from the Next Steps Age 25 Sweep

Background

The Next Steps Age 25 Sweep has provided valuable insights into the lives of young adults today. A total of 7,707 cohort members took part at this age, enhancing the study’s value as a resource for researchers to gain an insight into the millennial generation as they leave their adolescence behind and enter early adulthood. This data will allow researchers to explore how cohort members’ educational choices, family resources and experiences in adolescence have influenced their life chances so far.

Research details

Project title

Initial findings from the Next Steps Age 25 sweep

Project lead

Lisa Calderwood

Themes

Education

Employment, income and wealth

Expectations, attitudes and beliefs

Health behaviour

Mental health and wellbeing

Physical health

Poverty

Dates

2015-2016

Funders

ESRC

Summary

Our initial findings from the Age 25 Sweep cover a range of themes, from health to political perceptions. On this page you can read the full series of briefings.

Economic activity and health

This paper reveals:

  • Over two thirds of 25-year-olds were employed full-time.
  • 15 per cent were professionals, such as teachers, scientists, accountants or lawyers.
  • Having a zero-hours contract and being unemployed were associated with poorer health.

Read the briefing paper

Politics, perceptions and identity

This paper shows:

  • Over half (56%) of adults aged 25 said they had little to no interest in politics.
  • 64 per cent did not think Britain is a place where hard work is rewarded.
  • 59 per cent felt their opportunities in life had improved compared to those of their parents.

Read the briefing paper

The role of diet and exercise on weight and health

This paper reveals:

  • 42 per cent of 25-year-olds were overweight or obese.
  • 88 per cent rated their health as excellent, good or very good.
  • Getting seven hours’ sleep or more per night lowered the odds of being overweight or obese.

Read the briefing paper

Mental health

This paper shows:

  • 1 in 4 25-year-olds showed signs of mental health, compared to around 1 in 5 were they were aged 14 and 16.
  • Poor mental health at age 16 more than doubles the odds of exhibiting mental health problems at age 25.
  • Getting six hours’ sleep per night at 25, relative to nine of more, doubles the odds of reporting mental ill health.

Read the briefing paper

Outputs

News

Twentysomethings think hard work doesn’t pay nowadays, new study finds

30 June 2017 Sixty-four per cent of 25-year-olds disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement that ‘Britain is a place where hard work is rewarded’, suggesting that many twentysomethings do not see Britain as a ‘meritocracy’.
Publication

Next Steps Age 25 initial findings - Politics, perceptions and identity

This briefing paper summarises 25-year-olds’ experiences of adulthood, political interest and perception of opportunities. It describes the proportion who have an interest in politics, and…

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News

One in four millennials show signs of poor mental health, study finds

28 June 2017 Psychological problems are on the rise for young adults, with greater numbers reporting poor mental health in their mid-twenties than during adolescence.
Publication

Next Steps Age 25 initial findings - Mental health

This briefing paper summarises the experiences of mental health problems among the Next Steps cohort at age 25. It explores the prevalence of probable mental…

Download
News

Getting enough sleep could help prevent you from becoming obese, research finds  

26 June 2017 People who get a good night’s sleep are less likely to be overweight or obese, according to a new study.
Publication

Next Steps Age 25 initial findings - The role of diet and exercise on weight and health

This briefing paper summarises the effects of diet and exercise on weight and general health at age 25. It explores the prevalence and risks for…

Download
News

Being on a zero-hours contract is bad for your health, new study reveals  

5 July 2017 Young adults who are employed on zero-hours contracts are less likely to be in good health, and are at higher risk of poor mental health than workers with stable jobs.
Publication

Next Steps Age 25 initial findings - Economic activity and health

This briefing paper summarises 25-year-olds’ experience with the labour market. More specifically, it explores the nature of the cohort members’ current jobs, and the proportion…

Download

Relevant studies

Contact us

Centre for Longitudinal Studies
UCL Institute of Education

20 Bedford Way
London WC1H 0AL

Email: clsfeedback@ucl.ac.uk