Social mobility mechanisms and consequences

Background

This project provided empirical evidence on curricula delivery variation in the UK and institutional differences through analysis of Next Steps and linked National Pupil Database data. This was part of our Cross Cohort Research Programme.

Research details

Project title

Social mobility mechanisms and consequences

Project lead

Alice Sullivan

Themes

Education

Social mobility

Dates

1 July 2015 – December 2018

Funder

ESRC

Summary

The school curriculum is increasingly varied both within and between schools. We were interested in the implications of this range of inequalities between pupils as they progress through the education system and beyond. The project has huge implications for policy-making with respect to the curricula, school differentiation and sources of influence for young people’s decision-making. Furthermore, it reinforces the importance of debate regarding sources of educational inequality and social mobility factors.

This project provided empirical evidence on curricula delivery variation in the UK and institutional differences through analysis of Next Steps (previously known as the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England, LSYPE) and linked National Pupil Database data. The project used a mixture of modelling to examine multiple types of individual inequalities, such as gender, ethnicity and class.

Researchers

Alice Sullivan Professor of Sociology and Head of Research for the Social Research Institute

Phone: 020 7612 6661
Email: alice.sullivan@ucl.ac.uk

Alice’s research interests are focussed on social and educational inequalities and the intergenerational transmission of advantage and disadvantage.

Jake Anders UCL Institute of Education

Morag Henderson Associate Professor and Principal Investigator of Next Steps

Phone: 020 7911 5566
Email: morag.henderson@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Henderson’s main area of research is inequalities across the life course. More specifically she examines patterns in educational attainment, bullying and wellbeing.

Morag oversees all aspects of CLS’s work on Next Steps, and leads on the strategic and scientific direction of the study.

Vanessa Moulton Research Associate

Phone: 020 7612 6288
Email: vanessa.moulton@ucl.ac.uk

Vanessa is currently working on the initial findings for the most recent age 14 sweep of the Millennium Cohort Study. She also works on the CLS Cross-Cohort Research Program (CCRP) investigating social mobility, focusing on parental wealth on children’s development and school curriculum on educational transitions. In addition, Vanessa co-coordinates the CLS cohort workshops and webinars.

Her research interests include using longitudinal and secondary data analysis to examine early life course on children’s and adult mental health, educational and socio-economic outcomes.

George Ploubidis Professor of Population Health and Statistics, Research Director and Principal Investigator of the National Child Development Study and 1970 British Cohort Study

Phone: 020 7612 6107
Email: g.ploubidis@ucl.ac.uk

George is Professor of Population Health and Statistics at the UCL Social Research Institute and currently holds the posts of Research Director and Principal Investigator of the National Child Development Study and 1970 British Cohort Study at the Centre for Longitudinal Studies. Prior to joining UCL he held posts at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Cambridge. George is a multidisciplinary quantitative social scientist and a longitudinal population surveys methodologist. His main research interests relate to socioeconomic and demographic determinants of health over the life course and the mechanisms that underlie generational differences in health and mortality. His methodological work in longitudinal surveys focusses on applications for handling missing data, causal inference and measurement error.

Relevant studies

Contact us

Centre for Longitudinal Studies
UCL Social Research Institute

20 Bedford Way
London WC1H 0AL

Email: clsfeedback@ucl.ac.uk