Intergenerational influences on physical activity

Background

This project investigates the influence of work and family status on exercise and sedentary behaviour in childhood and adult life, taking account of intersections with socio-economic position and gender. The project is part of the Cross Cohort Research Programme.

Research details

Project title

Intergenerational influences on physical activity

Project lead

George Ploubidis

Themes

Employment, income and wealth

Family and social networks

Physical health

Dates

1 June 2016 – December 2018

Funder

ESRC

Summary

The project uses data from the 1958 National Child Development Study (NCDS) and the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) to investigate the influence of work and family status on exercise and sedentary behaviour in childhood and adult life, taking account of intersections with socio-economic position and gender. The project uses a mixture of modelling to identify physical activity longitudinal typologies in order to quantify change and stability over the life course.

Outputs

News

Private school education linked to better health more than 25 years later, study finds

11 May 2016 Private school pupils are more likely than their peers at comprehensives to have a lower body mass index (BMI) by the time they reach their early 40s. They also spend less time watching television and eat fewer take-away meals, according to new research published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Featured scientific publications

Bann D, Chen H, Bonell C, Glynn NW, Fielding RA, Manini T, et al (2016)
Socioeconomic differences in the benefits of structured physical activity compared with health education on the prevention of major mobility disability in older adults: the LIFE study
Journal of epidemiology and community health. 2016;70(9):930-3
Read the full paper
Bann D, Hamer M, Parsons S, Ploubidis G, Sullivan A (2016)
Does an elite education benefit health? Findings from the 1970 British Cohort Study.
International Journal of Epidemiology (online first May 10, 2016).
Read the full paper

Researchers

George Ploubidis Professor of Population Health and Statistics, Research Director & Chief Statistician

Phone: 020 7612 6107
Email: g.ploubidis@ucl.ac.uk

George is Professor of Population Health and Statistics at the Department of Social Science and currently holds the posts of Research Director and Chief Statistician at the Centre for Longitudinal Studies. Prior to joining UCL he held posts at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Cambridge.

George is a multidisciplinary Quantitative Social Scientist with a primary interest in socio-economic, demographic and macrosocial/structural determinants of population health and the mechanisms that link these over the life course. He leads the Applied Statistical Methods programme at the Centre for Longitudinal Studies and is PI on the ESRC funded Cross-Cohort Research Programme,investigating determinants of healthy behaviours and lifestyles and the intergenerational transmission of economic status over the life course.

David Bann Lecturer and Co-Investigator of the National Child Development Study

Phone: 020 7911 5426
Email: david.bann@ucl.ac.uk

David is an epidemiologist with broad interests in population health, and particular interests in health inequalities, obesity and physical activity levels.

David contributes to the scientific development of the 1958 British birth cohort study (National Child Development Study) by planning future data collections, preparing funding applications, and helping to maximise its scientific potential.

Mark Hamer University of Loughborough / University College London

Benedetta Pongiglione Research Associate

Benedetta worked as a Research Associate for CLS from 2016-2018. During her time here, she undertook methodological research on the different British cohort studies and investigated the determinants of healthy behaviours and lifestyles, and the intergenerational transmission of social capital and economic status.

Benedetta has a PhD in epidemiology and population health from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Her research interests include socio-economic inequalities in health, and inequalities in trajectories of healthy ageing. She now works at Bocconi University.

Alice Sullivan Professor of Sociology and Principal Investigator of 1970 British Cohort Study

Phone: 020 7612 6661
Email: alice.sullivan@ucl.ac.uk

Alice leads the team responsible for developing the content, design and analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study.  Her research interests are focussed on social and educational inequalities and the intergenerational transmission of advantage and disadvantage.

Relevant studies

This research project investigates the influence of work and family status on exercise and sedentary behaviour in childhood and adult life.

Contact us

Centre for Longitudinal Studies
UCL Institute of Education

20 Bedford Way
London WC1H 0AL

Email: clsfeedback@ucl.ac.uk